Charge-Domain Analog/Mixed-Signal Circuits

Analog/mixed-signal circuits traditionally have relied on continuous-time, static-power elements. However, there is a rising opportunity for circuits that focus on "charge" as the main mode of implementing electrical function. These circuits are efficient as they inherently focus on energy, and provide useful characteristics (such as, noise-efficiency, dynamicity, reusability, scalability) that previous generation analog/mixed-signal circuits could not. I am pioneering this new-found design approach to demonstrate highly resource efficient circuits for applications in energy management, sensor front-end, and communication circuits.

Related Publications

  • ISSCC 2021

  • VLSI 2020 (link) - 3rd author as the inventor of the approach

  • ISSCC 2019 (link), JSSC 2019 (link)

  • VLSI 2018 (link), SSCL 2018 (link) - 3rd author as the inventor of the approach

  • ISSCC 2017 (link) JSSC 2017 (link) - 2nd author as the inventor of the approach

Compact Analogs for Emerging Applications

The next wave of circuit applications are enabled by array of high performance analogs (and ADCs). These emerging applications include 5G/6G MIMO transceivers, in-memory compute arrays, >100Gbps serial-links, neural probe interfaces, 3D imagers, and many more things to come. Yet, conventional analog circuits greatly discount the effect of size, hence it adversely affects the system cost and robustness when used in an array. I find opportunities in this regard to make them more compact and energy-efficient resorting to novel design approaches (e.g. charge-injection technique for ADCs) that focus on improving performance per area of these analogs. With these techniques, I intend to further scale down analog circuits by design.

Related Publications

  • VLSI 2018 (link), SSCL 2018 (link) - 3rd author as the inventor of the approach

  • ISSCC 2016 (link)

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Low-Power and Small Sensors/Actuators Interface for IoT

As battery life and production cost is directly linked to the commercial success of IoT and wearables, enabling family of low-energy sensors/actuators is becoming highly important. Wearables based on low-power sensors/actuators (in milli-to-micro Watts) have successfully debuted as a commercial product. Yet, the requirement for battery has it conform to a rather strange form-factor. I believe that by enabling lower power family of sensors/actuators (in nano-Watts), and by making them much smaller would enable artistic design of these everyday things while providing the convenience of modern electronics. 

Related Publications

  • TCAS-I in writing, about low-power imaging system

  • ISSCC 2021

  • VLSI 2020 (link), JSSC 2020 - nth author for consulting

  • ISSCC 2019 (link), JSSC 2019 (link)

  • VLSI 2018 (link), SSCL 2018 (link) - 3rd author as the inventor of the approach

  • VLSI 2017 (link) - 3rd author for consulting

Infraboards - the testing companion

For the good of everyone, I have designed (and still am contributing) several small PCB modules that help people to generate voltages, currents and to measure them. These functionalities are modularized and packed on to a small PCB (1cm x few cm) to enable highly portable and easy to configure test setups for IC designers. It prompted positive responses when I demoed it at ISSCC along with my circuit that got into the conference. Let me know if you'd want to give it a try :) - I am pretty sure my future students will enjoy them!